Ultra Deep Clean with Sonics – Building a simple Ultrasound Cleaner

Ultra Deep Clean with Sonics – Building a simple Ultrasound Cleaner

Ultrasonic cleaning is the rapid and complete removal of contaminants from objects by immersing them in a tank of liquid flooded with high-frequency sounds waves. These non-audible sound waves create a scrubbing brush action within the fluid. They are used for cleaning jewelry, for mixing chemicals- all sorts. Anything you put into the tank gets vibrated at very high-frequency,  in this case, 28,000 times a second.

 

The process is brought about by high-frequency electrical energy that is converted by a transducer into high-frequency sound waves – ultrasonic energy. Its ability to clean even the most tenacious substances from items derives from the core of the unit: the transducer. The cleaning power of a unit stems from the transducers performance.

The efficiency of the transducer will affect both the cleaning time and efficacy achieved during the cleaning cycle. A poor quality transducer will use more power and take longer to clean items than a good transducer. The ultrasonic energy enters the liquid within the tank and causes the rapid formation and collapse of minute bubbles: a phenomenon known as cavitation. The bubbles rapidly increase in size until they implode against the surface of the item immersed in the tank in an enormous energy release, which lifts contamination off the surface and innermost recesses of intricately shaped parts.

 

For more information, read our paper:  Ultrasonic Fuel Treatment Gateway to Nickel Hydrogen LENR

  • Simon Derricutt

    It would be nice to know the source of the components you used and the costs. I’m just thinking forward to the point where I get the time to try out the pure Lithium reactor…. It’s also useful to know the efficiency of the system you actually got and its reliability.

    • Alan Smith

      Hi Simon. The US generator came from a regular supplier on Alibaba. The transducer supplied is not really ideal, being a broadband type (22-200kHz) so I am purchasing a dedicated 100W 28kHz transducer via Ebay to replace the one in the video. Total cost of the whole assembly with tank, equipment box and fan (including the new horn) is just under $150.00.

      Reliability and efficiency are yet to be determined!

      • Simon Derricutt

        Thanks Alan. I’ll look forward to the reliability tests….